I am lizardbreathwalker, and I am a nerd.

28th July 2014

Photo with 1 note

#musicislife

#musicislife

Tagged: musicislife

28th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from LORDE with 18,049 notes

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." - Diane Arbus

Source: vintagegal

28th July 2014

Post reblogged from super cool blog with 297,120 notes

lamapalooza:

this is your captain speaking, AND THIS IS YOUR CAPTAIN SHOUTING.

Source: lamapalooza

26th July 2014

Photo

Put on #makeup and a #bow and I accidentally became #snowwhite… Oh, yeah, I dyed my hair a different color btw.

Put on #makeup and a #bow and I accidentally became #snowwhite… Oh, yeah, I dyed my hair a different color btw.

Tagged: makeupsnowwhitebow

25th July 2014

Photo

Interesting food from today’s trip to kroger… #ricecandy… Not as good as I had hoped. But at least there was a free sticker inside!

Interesting food from today’s trip to kroger… #ricecandy… Not as good as I had hoped. But at least there was a free sticker inside!

Tagged: ricecandy

23rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Sometimes, a chair is just a chair. with 172,342 notes

ealperin:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

itsjustlarz:

PEOPLE NEED TO LEARN THAT LAST ONE FOREAL

HEY

image

it’s okay I know everybody forgets Meet The Robinsons so I got your back

I think we’re forgetting someone:

image

image

image

Source: disney-where-dreams-come-true

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from The Lost Kid with 231,577 notes

bassfanimation:

comedownstairsandsayhello:

frecklesandink:

momamiaaa:

Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to sting because of lack of predators in the lake and you can swim with them!

BUCKET LIST.

WAIT BUT THAT’S NOT EVEN THE COOLEST PART: These jellyfish carry small populations of algae inside their bodies and derive much of their nutrition from the sugars that the algae produce. The jellyfish follow the sun across the lake each day and rotate continuously, so that the algae are always getting maximum sunlight exposure for photosynthesis. Then at night they dive to deeper parts of the lake so the algae can absorb nitrogen. It’s one of the best examples of endosymbiosis in action and it’s KICKASS.

FLOATY FRIEND CABBAGES

bassfanimation:

comedownstairsandsayhello:

frecklesandink:

momamiaaa:

Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to sting because of lack of predators in the lake and you can swim with them!

BUCKET LIST.

WAIT BUT THAT’S NOT EVEN THE COOLEST PART: These jellyfish carry small populations of algae inside their bodies and derive much of their nutrition from the sugars that the algae produce. The jellyfish follow the sun across the lake each day and rotate continuously, so that the algae are always getting maximum sunlight exposure for photosynthesis. Then at night they dive to deeper parts of the lake so the algae can absorb nitrogen. It’s one of the best examples of endosymbiosis in action and it’s KICKASS.

FLOATY FRIEND CABBAGES

Source: momamiaaa

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from The Lost Kid with 106,599 notes

lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

 Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded



If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?
It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.
In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.
“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.
What does this mean?
In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.
However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.
These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.
In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.
This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:
How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?
Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.
How can a squib be born to wizard parents?
Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.
How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?
The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.
You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.




Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.



FAVOURITE THING

lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded

If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.

“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.

What does this mean?

In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.

However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.

These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.

In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.

This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:

How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?

Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.

How can a squib be born to wizard parents?

Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.

How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?

The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.

You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.

image

FAVOURITE THING

Source: mothernaturenetwork

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from I'M A NERD AND I ENJOY IT with 255,150 notes

emilyissherlocked:

africant:

 vthebookworm:

ragglefraggles:

when they say youre too old for disney

The hop, I can’t. I cackled.

BUT DID YOU NOTICE AURORA

Source: ragglefraggles

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from oprah was here with 70,816 notes

nubbsgalore:

fireflies in timelapse, photos by (click pic) vincent bradytakehito miyataketsuneaki hiramatsu and spencer black

Source: nubbsgaloretumblr.com